IOFILM : FILM : REVIEW

Hitch rating 
3/5 Hitch

   
Director Andy Tennant
Writer Kevin Bisch
Stars Will Smith, Eva Mendes, Kevin James, Amber Valletta, Julie Ann Emery, Robinne Lee, Nathan Lee Graham, Adam Arkin, Michael Rapaport
Certificate 12A
Running time 115 minutes
Country US
Year 2005
Associated shops

Reviewed by Mostic

In Hitch, Will Smith plays New York-based Alex 'Hitch' Hitchens, a dating consultant, who helps out guys who have a lot going for them - nice cars, good salaries, jobs and smart houses - but don't know the first thing about how to approach and chat up women. Guys, in short, who are in dire need of a smooth-tongued Cyrano de Bergerac type who can give them the right lines and get them from first base to 20th in a matter of a few weeks. Alex is the man for the task.

While helping out plump, inhibited city accountant Albert (Kevin James) with his love life, he makes a pig's ear of his own. He's got involved with feisty gossip columnist Sara (Eva Mendes) and his moves appear to be working just fine - check out the breakfast date that involves water-skiing! - but the path of true love doesn't always run smooth, as Alex is about to find out.

Andy Tennant (Sweet Home Alabama) directs this slight, but entertaining, romantic comedy with a degree of visual flair, making the most of what is standard fare. Smith wants you to love him from the moment he walks on the screen, in a Cary Grant kind of a way, and is always engaging. Mendes is the perfect foil, since her character doesn't suffer fools gladly.

It should be a big couples' hit, since Hitch is talking a lot about the behaviour of women and guys may learn a thing or two, while women will enjoy seeing what Alex picks on when it comes to the difficult subject of dating.

Hitch is unmemorable - you'll enjoy a few laughs for the two hours it takes, but won't remember much tomorrow - and yet Smith fans will not be disappointed. His talking-to-camera role is a departure from other parts he's played.

If you're just after two hours entertainment, where you don't have to think too hard, this might well be the ticket.

Printer-friendly version